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  1530 Central Avenue  
  Middletown, Ohio 45044  
  513-425-7140  
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2019- 2020 AUDITIONS
  ANDRE'S MOTHER and MOTHERS & SONS  
  TWELFTH NIGHT  
  THE IMORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST  
     
         
  ANDRE’S MOTHER and MOTHERS & SONS
by Terrence McNally
Directed by Charley Shafor

AUDITION DATES:
August 5, 6 & 7 @ 7pm – 8:30pm
Cold readings from script  
 
PRODUCTION DATES
November 1, 2, 8 & 9 – there is a matinee on the second Saturday  

SYNOPSIS:
ANDRE’S MOTHER At Andre Gerard’s memorial, his lover Cal Porter tries one last time to get through to André's mother, an imposing figure in Andre's life. Not realizing her hidden emotions, he tells her everything he can before leaving her alone to deal with her own sense of grief and loneliness. Also attending are Cal’s father Arthur and his sister Penny. This small group of mourners let us see into the AIDS health crisis and how it can affect society’s outlook on acceptance.  

MOTHERS AND SONS It’s now twenty years since Andre Gerard’s funeral and his mother Katherine has decided to pay an unexpected visit to her late son's partner Cal, who is now married to another man and has a young son. Challenged to face how society has changed around her, generations collide as she revisits the past and begins to see the life her son might have led. A multi-generation look at the AIDS crisis, gay marriage, survivor guilt, homophobia and fear are revealed through humor, anxiety, regret and longing and possibly a lesson that any problem can be solved with Oreos and milk.  

CHARACTERS:
All ethnicity’s considered.  If you feel you look the age than please audition. Two of the characters in Andre’s Mother: Arthur Ogden and Penny Ogden have been cast  

KATHERINE GERARD – This character plays herself at two different ages somewhere between her mid-to late 40’s to her 60’s. She has recently widowed and still angry and bitter over losing her only child to HIV. Katherine needs to show a wide range of emotion from humor to fear to abject sorrow. (McNally wrote this play and dedicated it to Tyne Daley who played Katherine on Broadway.)

CAL OGDAN – This character plays himself at two different ages ranging from his mid to late 20’s to his 40’s. He is a financial advisor. He was Andre’s partner and perhaps like other widows and widowers, still has deep feelings for a deceased partner that they will carry forever. Now married to Will, Cal is only too aware of how they live in a safer more accepting world

WILL PORTER—Will is in his late 20’s early 30’s and carries a physical confidence that gay men are now living in a more inclusive world and can marry the one they love. He is a writer who is very aware of what Andre meant to Cal but has accepted that Cal is in love with him until Katherine’s arrival.

BUD OGDAN-PORTER—Bud, son of Cal and Will, is a precocious 6-year-old boy who brings an innocence and love to an otherwise tense situation. We are looking for a boy between the age of 6 to 10 who can pass for a 6-8-year-old.
     
  TWELFTH NIGHT
Written by William Shakesphere
Directed by Claire LaNicca

AUDITION DATES:
November 11, 12 & 13 – 7pm – 8:30
Cold readings from the script

PRODUCTION DATES:
MARCH 20, 21, 27 & 28 - there is a matinee on the second Saturday

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:
No-Conflict Dates: March 14 – 19 – These dates include, tech & dress rehearsals Remainder of rehearsal schedule will be determined upon casting

CHARACTERS – Gender bending is possible for all characters except the twins Viola & Sebastian  

Viola - A young woman of aristocratic birth, and the play’s protagonist. Washed up on the shore of Illyria when her ship is wrecked in a storm, Viola decides to make her own way in the world. She disguises herself as a young man, calling herself "Cesario," and becomes a page to Duke Orsino. She ends up falling in love with Orsino—even as Olivia, the woman Orsino is courting, falls in love with Cesario. Thus, Viola finds that her clever disguise has entrapped her: she cannot tell Orsino that she loves him, and she cannot tell Olivia why she, as Cesario, cannot love her. Her poignant plight is the central conflict in the play.

Orsino - A powerful nobleman in the country of Illyria. Orsino is lovesick for the beautiful Lady Olivia, but becomes more and more fond of his handsome new page boy, Cesario, who is actually a woman—Viola. Orsino is a vehicle through which the play explores the absurdity of love: a supreme egotist, Orsino mopes around complaining how heartsick he is over Olivia, when it is clear that he is chiefly in love with the idea of being in love and enjoys making a spectacle of himself. His attraction to the ostensibly male Cesario injects sexual ambiguity into his character.

Olivia - A wealthy, beautiful, and noble Illyrian lady, Olivia is courted by Orsino and Sir Andrew Aguecheek, but to each of them she insists that she is in mourning for her brother, who has recently died, and will not marry for seven years. She and Orsino are similar characters in that each seems to enjoy wallowing in his or her own misery. Viola’s arrival in the masculine guise of Cesario enables Olivia to break free of her self-indulgent melancholy. Olivia seems to have no difficulty transferring her affections from one love interest to the next, however, suggesting that her romantic feelings—like most emotions in the play—do not run deep.

Sebastian - Viola’s lost twin brother. When he arrives in Illyria, traveling with Antonio, his close friend and protector, Sebastian discovers that many people think that they know him. Furthermore, the beautiful Lady Olivia, whom he has never met, wants to marry him. Sebastian is not as well rounded a character as his sister. He seems to exist to take on the role that Viola fills while disguised as Cesario—namely, the mate for Olivia.

Malvolio - The straitlaced steward—or head servant—in the household of Lady Olivia. Malvolio is very efficient but also very self-righteous, and he has a poor opinion of drinking, singing, and fun. His priggishness and haughty attitude earn him the enmity of Sir Toby, Sir Andrew, and Maria, who play a cruel trick on him, making him believe that Olivia is in love with him. In his fantasies about marrying his mistress, he reveals a powerful ambition to rise above his social class.

Feste - The clown, or fool, of Olivia’s household, Feste moves between Olivia’s and Orsino’s homes. He earns his living by making pointed jokes, singing old songs, being generally witty, and offering good advice cloaked under a layer of foolishness. In spite of being a professional fool, Feste often seems the wisest character in the play.

Sir Toby - Olivia’s uncle. Olivia lets Sir Toby Belch live with her, but she does not approve of his rowdy behavior, practical jokes, heavy drinking, late-night carousing, or friends (specifically the idiotic Sir Andrew). Sir Toby also earns the ire of Malvolio. But Sir Toby has an ally, and eventually a mate, in Olivia’s sharp-witted waiting-gentlewoman, Maria. Together they bring about the triumph of chaotic spirit, which Sir Toby embodies, and the ruin of the controlling, self-righteous Malvolio.

Maria - Olivia’s clever, daring young waiting-gentlewoman. Maria is remarkably similar to her antagonist, Malvolio, who harbors aspirations of rising in the world through marriage. But Maria succeeds where Malvolio fails—perhaps because she is a woman, but, more likely, because she is more in tune than Malvolio with the anarchic, topsy-turvy spirit that animates the play.

Sir Andrew Aguecheek  - A friend of Sir Toby’s. Sir Andrew Aguecheek attempts to court Olivia, but he doesn’t stand a chance. He thinks that he is witty, brave, young, and good at languages and dancing, but he is actually an idiot.

Antonio - A man who rescues Sebastian after his shipwreck. Antonio has become very fond of Sebastian, caring for him, accompanying him to Illyria, and furnishing him with money—all because of a love so strong that it seems to be romantic in nature. Antonio’s attraction to Sebastian, however, never bears fruit. Despite the ambiguous and shifting gender roles in the play, Twelfth Night remains a romantic comedy in which the characters are destined for marriage. In such a world, homoerotic attraction cannot be fulfilled.
     
         
  THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST
By: Oscar Wilde
Directed by: Charley Shafor  

AUDITION DATES:
Sunday, January 12 – 2pm – 4:30pm
Monday, January 13 – 7pm – 8:30pm
Tuesday, January 14 – 7pm – 8:30pm
Cold Readings from script  
Rehearsals begin: Mid-March

PRODUCTION DATES:
May 1, 2, 8 & 9 – there is a matinee on the second Saturday   

CHARACTERS
John (Jack/Ernest) Worthing, J.P. (20’s – 30’s) - The play’s protagonist. Jack Worthing is a seemingly responsible(50’s and above)  and respectable young man who leads a double life. In Hertfordshire, where he has a country estate, Jack is known as Jack. In London he is known as Ernest. As a baby, Jack was discovered in a handbag in the cloakroom of Victoria Station by an old man who adopted him and subsequently made Jack guardian to his granddaughter, Cecily Cardew. Jack is in love with his friend Algernon’s cousin, Gwendolen Fairfax. The initials after his name indicate that he is a Justice of the Peace.  

Algernon Moncrieff -(20’s – 30’s)  The play’s secondary hero. Algernon is a charming, idle, decorative bachelor, nephew of Lady Bracknell, cousin of Gwendolen Fairfax, and best friend of Jack Worthing, whom he has known for years as Ernest. Al(50’s and above) gernon is brilliant, witty, selfish, amoral, and given to making delightful paradoxical and epigrammatic pronouncements. He has invented a fictional friend, “Bunbury,” an invalid whose frequent sudden relapses allow Algernon to wriggle out of unpleasant or dull social obligations.

Gwendolen Fairfax -(20’s – 30’s)  Algernon’s cousin and Lady Bracknell’s daughter. Gwendolen is in love with Jack, whom she knows as Erne(50’s and above) st. A model and arbiter of high fashion and society, Gwendolen speaks with unassailable authority on matters of taste and morality. She is sophisticated, intellectual, cosmopolitan, and utterly pretentious. Gwendolen is fixated on the name Ernest and says she will not marry a man without that name.  

Cecily Cardew -(20’s – 30’s)   Cecily is probably the most realistically drawn character in the play. Like Gwendolen, she is obsessed with the name Ernest, but she is even more intrigued by the idea of wickedness. This idea, rather than the virtuous-sounding name, has prompted her to fall in love with Jack’s brother Ernest in her imagination and to invent an elab(50’s and above) orate romance and courtship between them.  

Lady Bracknell – (50’s and above) Algernon’s snobbish, mercenary, and domineering aunt and Gwendolen’s mother. Lady Bracknell married well, and her primary goal in life is to see her daughter do the same. She has a list of “eligible young men” and a prepared interview she gives to potential suitors. Like her nephew, Lady Bracknell is given to making hilarious pronouncements, but where Algernon means to be witty, the humor in Lady Bracknell’s speeches is unintentional. She is cunning, narrow-minded, authoritarian, and possibly the most quotable character in the play.  

Miss Prism - (50’s and above) Cecily’s governess. Miss Prism is an endless source of pedantic bromides and clichés. She highly approves of Jack’s presumed respectability and harshly criticizes his “unfortunate” brother. Puritan though she is, Miss Prism’s severe pronouncements have a way of going so far over the top that they inspire laughter. Despite her rigidity, Miss Prism seems to have a softer side. She speaks of having once written a novel whose manuscript was “lost” or “abandoned.” Also, she entertains romantic feelings for Dr. Chasuble.  

Rev. Canon Chasuble, D.D. - (50’s and above)The rector on Jack’s estate. Both Jack and Algernon approach Dr. Chasuble to request that they be christened “Ernest.” Dr. Chasuble entertains secret romantic feelings for Miss Prism. The initials after his name stand for “Doctor of Divinity.”  

Lane - (50’s and above) Algernon’s manservant. When the play opens, Lane is the only person who knows about Algernon’s practice of “Bunburying.” Lane appears only in Act I.  

Merriman - (50’s and above) The butler at the Manor House, Jack’s estate in the country. Merriman appears only in Acts II and III.